writersnoonereads:

No one reads the Queen of the Underworld (1850–1924).

In 1913, Sophie Lyons wrote her memoirs, chronicling six decades of bank robberies, prison breaks, cons, and swindles that left her a rich woman. One hundred years later, we’re [Combustion Books] bringing this important work back into print, casting back the veil of the 19th century criminal underworld. This is the world of fences and art thieves, bank sneaks and conwomen, but it is punctuated by a remarkable and nearly universal honor among thieves. Fully illustrated throughout with numerous diagrams of robbery methods and ways of concealing stolen valuables.

via Brickbat Books (my favorite Philadelphia bookstore)

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

(via coeurensabot)

#manlove  

(via letwordsfly)

From this vast array of XXX-rated artwork we can make a few deductions about Greek aesthetic preferences, genitaliawise (here I mainly follow Kenneth Dover’s landmark study Greek Homosexuality, 1978): (1) Long, thick penises were considered—at least in the highbrow view— grotesque, comic, or both and were usually found on fertility gods, half-animal critters such as satyrs, ugly old men, and barbarians. A circumcised penis was particularly gross. (2) The ideal penis was small, thin, and covered with a long, tapered foreskin. Dover thinks the immature male’s equipment was especially admired, which may account not only for the small size but the scarcity of body hair in classical art. A passage from Aristophanes sums up the most desirable masculine features: “a gleaming chest, bright skin, broad shoulders, tiny tongue, strong buttocks, and a little prick.”

#history  

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

(via artistsuffer)

#history  

relative-pronoun:

SI ÞIN NAMA GEHALGOD: A booklet of weird Catholicism.

Si Þin Nama Gehalgod (‘hallowed be thy name’ in Old English) contains twenty vignettes, seven of which are new and were written specifically for this collection. If you enjoy rosaries made out of human teeth and monks cursing in sign language, then this chapbook is most certainly your kind of thing. The images are from the public domain and include engravings by Hieronymus Wierix (1553–1619) and Cornelis Galle the Elder (1576-1650) and Younger (1615-1678). Each booklet costs $6.15 CAD + shipping and can be purchased through my Big Cartel store.

Booklet details:

  • 5.5” x 8.5”
  • 16 pages
  • Cover is pink card stock; interior pages are cream-coloured
  • Printed in black and white
  • Saddle stitch binding with pink thread
  • Designed, printed, and bound by me, the person who wrote the things

Also available for purchase is my first collection of vignettes, Uncanny Anatomy.

(via sebastian-flyte)

#wants  

Monster" is derived from the Latin noun monstrum, "divine portent," itself formed on the root of the verb monere, "to warn." It came to refer to living things of anomalous shape or structure, or to fabulous creatures like the sphinx who were composed of strikingly incongruous parts, because the ancients considered the appearance of such beings to be a sign of some impending supernatural event. Monsters, like angels, functioned as messengers and heralds of the extraordinary. They served to announce impending revelation, saying, in effect, "Pay attention; something of profound importance is happening.

My Words to Victor Frankenstein: by Susan Stryker (via whatmonstrosity)

slams down the door

OKAY SO, the etymology of “monster” is still up for some p serious debate in comparative literature and there’s a lot of backtracking that wants to link monstrosity as a sign from God/as a derivative of the infinitive “to show” or “to warn,” but there’s really no clear or immediate path to actually state that this is, in fact, the intended link of language especially in crossing over languages (e.g., to English) where a lot of those prefixes or suffixes are lost in translation. (For instance, it’s easy in English to fancy the wordplay of “friend” versus “fiend” in the way Victor addresses the Creature v the way he addresses Elizabeth or Clerval; but the more potent pairing of words is “friend” versus “enemy” and this only comes with realizing that MWS being multi-lingual would know that in romance languages, “enemy” is the most direct translation of the prefix preceding the concept creating “no friends” while “friend” in English is a completely new linguistic construct alien to its roots of ami/amigo/etc. that’s still inherent in the word “enemy,” which means that when Victor and the Creature damn each other as one another’s enemy, it’s a promise to ensure that the other has virtually no friends which is incredible linguistic foreshadowing to the Creature’s murder spree.) It’s a neat pairing and retrospectively very illuminating, but it might not necessarily be reflective of what people of that time intended to convey with the word “monster.”

THAT SAID, it definitely is a v v illuminating perspective especially from a socio-political platform in conceiving of the Early Modern Body Politik and the abundant politically charged pamphlets portraying “monstrous births” as the products of institutional corruption. Though the “to show”/”to warn” etymology didn’t really pick up traction until long after the magic lantern/panorama and the dawn of the days of traveling circuses/sideshows which brought with it a new kind of moralistic agenda.

(via marygodwinning)

(via marygodwinning)

animalstalkinginallcaps:

FUCKING MONDAYS, AM I RIGHT?

DON’T EVEN GET ME STARTED. THERE ISN’T ENOUGH COFFEE IN THE WORLD TO HELP ME RIGHT NOW. I WAS UP UNTIL 4AM LOOKING AT INTERIOR DESIGN BLOGS. I HAVE NO IDEA WHY. I’M NOT EVEN ALLOWED TO PAINT MY APARTMENT.

THE INTERNET IS THE WORST FOR THAT KIND OF THING. ONE TIME I WENT ON WIKIPEDIA TRYING TO FIGURE OUT THE DRUMMER FROM DEF LEPPARD’S NAME AND I ACCIDENTALLY GOT A DEGREE IN NEUROBIOLOGY.

TELL ME ABOUT IT. I WAS TRYING TO DOWNLOAD SEABISCUIT AND NOW I’M AN ORDAINED MINISTER.

(via italane)

#gpoy  

ariellelikestocook:

A very nourishing lunch today {Chickpeas, 3-Rice Blend, Garlic-Sautéed Spinach, Avocado, and Farmhouse Culture Spicy Wasabi Ginger Kimchi}

(via letseathealthy)

#foodporn  

ariellelikestocook:

Bringing dinner to work today: Lemony Massaged Kale with Nutritional Yeast and Garlic; Cannelini Beans, Roasted Sweet Potato, Roasted Red Onion, and Avocado

(via letseathealthy)

#food  

(via poetica-x)

#wants  

intheendyouwillallkneel:

turnyourgreyskiesblue:

Doing my work yesterday I came across a man called Herbert Beerbohm Tree, a Shakespearean actor from the 1800s… why is this important, I hear you ask. LOOK AT HIM:

image

I genuinely thought I had turned the page over to Tom Hiddleston. But the book I was looking at was written before Hiddles became super famous. 

No wonder he’s so into Shakespeare.

And here we have proof that Tom Hiddleston is a Shakespeare loving vampire.

(via falconktango)

Nail me to you. I will ride you like a nightmare.

Jeanette Winterson, Written On The Body (via allhopedies)

(via allhopedies)

#writing  

(via khaleesi)

#manlove  

suicideblonde:

Dita Von Teese

#ladylove  #dita